Found 250 km north of Cape Town, lies the vast Cederberg Conservancy. This rugged mountain terrain, some 182.000 ha, stretches from the Pakhuis Pass in the north to Groorivier in the south. This natural attraction offers abundant wildlife, stunning rock formations, ancient rock art, and is an internationally recognised biodiversity hotspot.

Escape to an ancient and enigmatic world that will astound you with amber rock formations, contrasting blue and burnt orange landscapes, and rich history. The Cederberg was made with adventure-seekers and nature-wanderers in mind, with 71.000 ha of hiking and rock-climbing hot spots. The Cederberg forms part of the Cape Floral Region and is a World Heritage Site, showing off some of South Africa’s most spectacular fauna and flora. Just over a 2-hour drive away from Cape Town, the Cederberg is ideal for those wanting a change of scenery.

Highlights

1
Hike to the famous Maltese Cross and Wolfberg Arch.
2
Admire ancient rock paintings at these spots: Stadsaal, Truitjieskraal, Southern Arch, and Vark Kloof.
3
Keep on the lookout for elusive Cape leopards, the rare Clanwilliam Cedar, and all 8 endemic fynbos birds.
4
Explore the area by doing a self-drive 4x4 route.
5
Do a day or overnight hike to take in the spectacular surroundings.
6
Experience the unique scenery on horseback or mountain bike.

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Best time to go to Cederberg Conservancy

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The Cederberg Mountains are fit for all seasons, with each bringing different aspects to enjoy. The best time to visit the Cederberg area is in Autumn, during April and May, due to cooler temperatures. This is when activities like hiking are much safer and more pleasurable. Winter, the end of May to August, is also a lovely time to visit, although it is the rainy season for this region, rainfall in the Cederberg area is considerably less than in other parts of the Western Cape.

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